A controversial statement from a writer

The topic I’m going to talk about today is somewhat contentious, given that it is the very bread and butter of a published author (my ultimate career goal). Admitting it seems like a counter-intuitive move, but I’ll say it anyway.

I don’t really like Continue reading

Advertisements

A Decision Has Been Made…

Well, I’ve thought long and hard about this and I’ve finally come to a resolution on the issue of the G. And the decision is that I’m going to let it go.

My main reason is this: my ultimate goal is not to be a blogger but a published writer, therefore my name needs to be in an appropriate form for the cover of a book, regardless of whether that book might end up being traditionally published or self-published. Think about it – have you ever seen Continue reading

‘Unkept’ by Ericka Clay

I am still trying to make a decision regarding my identity crisis (you can read my last post here), but in the meantime I offer up another book review.

Unkept is a brand new novel by author Ericka Clay. Upon the release of her book, Clay put out a call for reviewers so I volunteered for the job and, to my delight, she accepted.

Unkept - Ericka Clay

Unkept is written in the genre of women’s fiction and centres around two main characters, Vienna Oaks and Heather Hammel. Vienna is the manager of her father’s funeral home and Heather’s mother has just died, which Continue reading

Should I Lose The G?

I am having something of an identity crisis.

Writers, particularly writers who self-publish, have to build very heavily on their brand – and their brand is their name. The most successful writers (King, Rowling and the like) can sell a book based on their name alone – people will buy it without even knowing what it’s about, simply because they know who wrote it and they know that person’s writing is good.

For the smaller fish in the sea, it is important to Continue reading

‘Self-Printed’ by Catherine Ryan Howard

In keeping with the theme this month of posts relating to self-publishing (you can read my account of the recent Self-Publishing Day at the Irish Writers’ Centre here), I am now going to review a book on this subject, namely Self-Printed: The Sane Person’s Guide to Self-Publishing by Catherine Ryan Howard.

'Self-Printed: The Sane Person's Guide to Self-Publishing' by Catherine Ryan Howard

I first encountered Catherine and her book at the afore-mentioned Self-Publishing Day and it could not have been more fortuitous timing. It led me to Continue reading

Is Self-Publishing The Way To Go?

Up to this point of my writing ‘career’ (maybe that’s a laughable term but I’ll use it with a measure of dignity anyway), I have solely focused my efforts on getting published the traditional way: through an agent and a print publisher. Recently, however, I’ve started considering other options – specifically, going down the route of self-publishing. With this in mind, I decided to sign up to the Self-Publishing Day hosted by the Irish Writers’ Centre, which took place on Saturday 31st January.

This was definitely a good decision. There was such Continue reading

What I’ve Learned So Far…

As we come to the end of another year, I feel like it’s a good opportunity to take stock of where I am in terms of my writing endeavours and to assess what I have learned so far (emphasis on the so far bit – there is no end to the possibilities of what is out there, as-yet-unknown).

While I have had some small achievements this year, I am still sadly unpublished, so what I am about to write here is by no means an all-knowing guide. It’s just a reflection of my own personal experience of the writing world, containing Continue reading

‘Slouching Towards Kalamazoo’ by Peter De Vries

Well, this was a tough read…

Slouching Towards Kalamazoo is set in 1963 and is about 15-year-old Anthony Thrasher, an underachieving student of sophisticated intelligence, who manages to get his schoolteacher pregnant and then falls in love with the child’s babysitter. An entertaining premise, right? Hilarity must ensue, right?

I wish.

It took me three months to get through this book, and I spent most of that time Continue reading